In 2010 San Francisco passed a 'sit-lie' ordinance making it illegal to sit or sleep on city sidewalks during daylight hours.

In 2010 San Francisco passed a 'sit-lie' ordinance making it illegal to sit or sleep on city sidewalks during daylight hours.

 But people are resilient and creative, and find ways to evoke a sense of home even where there isn't one.

But people are resilient and creative, and find ways to evoke a sense of home even where there isn't one.

 These photos explore how anyone can become an architect, taking common city objects and repurposing them into a wall, a roof, a staircase, a home.

These photos explore how anyone can become an architect, taking common city objects and repurposing them into a wall, a roof, a staircase, a home.

 The view from above and the side is meant to evoke plan and elevation architectural drawings.

The view from above and the side is meant to evoke plan and elevation architectural drawings.

 The line between private and public, urban and domestic blurs.

The line between private and public, urban and domestic blurs.

 How do people cultivate a sense of a home in a city where opportunity isn't available?

How do people cultivate a sense of a home in a city where opportunity isn't available?

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 In 2010 San Francisco passed a 'sit-lie' ordinance making it illegal to sit or sleep on city sidewalks during daylight hours.
 But people are resilient and creative, and find ways to evoke a sense of home even where there isn't one.
 These photos explore how anyone can become an architect, taking common city objects and repurposing them into a wall, a roof, a staircase, a home.
 The view from above and the side is meant to evoke plan and elevation architectural drawings.
 The line between private and public, urban and domestic blurs.
 How do people cultivate a sense of a home in a city where opportunity isn't available?
5.jpg
8.jpg
newedits-3.jpg
newedits-2.jpg

In 2010 San Francisco passed a 'sit-lie' ordinance making it illegal to sit or sleep on city sidewalks during daylight hours.

But people are resilient and creative, and find ways to evoke a sense of home even where there isn't one.

These photos explore how anyone can become an architect, taking common city objects and repurposing them into a wall, a roof, a staircase, a home.

The view from above and the side is meant to evoke plan and elevation architectural drawings.

The line between private and public, urban and domestic blurs.

How do people cultivate a sense of a home in a city where opportunity isn't available?

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